Data

State-Level and Division-Level Data

Section 618 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that each state submit data about children with disabilities, ages 3 through 21, who receive special education and related services under Part B of IDEA. The U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) collects data from states and provides reports to Congress. In Virginia, data is reported for children ages birth through five who receive special education and related services under Part B of IDEA.

IDEA requires states to report state-level and division-level indicator data on the performance of students with disabilities. In Early Childhood Special Education (Section 619 of IDEA), there are three data indicators required by OSEP:

More information is available at the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) website.

Indicator 6:

States are required to report to OSEP:
  • the percent of children aged 3 through 5 with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) who attend a regular early childhood education program and receive the majority of special education and related services in the regular early childhood program.
  • the percent of children aged 3 through 5 with IEPs who attend a separate special education class, separate school, or residential facility.
*In Virginia, data is reported for children ages birth through five who receive special education and related services under Part B of IDEA.

Indicator 7:

States are required to report to OSEP:
  • the percent of preschool children aged 3 through 5 with IEPs who demonstrate improved:
    1. positive social emotional skills (including social relationships),
    2. acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/communication and early literacy), and
    3. use of appropriate behaviors that meet their needs.
*In Virginia, data is reported for children ages birth through five who receive special education and related services under Part B of IDEA.

Indicator 12:

States are required to report to OSEP:
  • the percent of children referred by Part C prior to age 3, who are found eligible for Part B, and who have an IEP developed and implemented by the beginning of the school year if they turn age two by Sept. 30 of that school year or by their third birthday.
*In Virginia, data is reported for children ages birth through five who receive special education and related services under Part B of IDEA.

State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR)

IDEA requires states to submit a performance plan which includes baseline data, targets, and improvement activities for the data indicators. This information is outlined in the Virginia State Performance Plan (SPP).

States are to provide annual reports on the state-level data and progress toward meeting state targets described in the state’s special education SPP. Progress is described in the Virginia Annual Performance Report (APR).

States are also to provide individual school division-level data and to report on whether the divisions met state targets described in the state’s special education SPP. The Annual Special Education Performance Report to the Public provides division-level data and compares the division’s performance to the state’s targets.

State-identified Measurable Result (SIMR) and State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP)

U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is implementing a Results-Driven Accountability (RDA) system under IDEA. RDA shifts OSEP’s accountability efforts from a primary emphasis on compliance to a framework that focuses on improved results for children with disabilities while continuing to ensure states meet IDEA requirements.

States are required to have a State-identified Measurable Result (SIMR). This is a goal identified by each state that is designed to improve results of students with disabilities. The State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) outlines how this goal will be addressed. To read more about Virginia’s SIMR and SSIP click here.

State Identified Measurable Result

Early Childhood Special Education

Early Childhood leadership at the VDOE believes that quality early childhood and early childhood special education programs are critical in order to provide all students every opportunity to graduate from high school in the future. James Heckman, a Nobel Laureate in Economics, found that early learning experiences have a significant impact on an individual’s success or failure. The Heckman curvei displayed below shows that the earlier the investment, the greater the return.
Heckman curve
Because of the importance of Early Childhood Education (ECE), the VDOE has outlined improvement strategies included in the SSIP designed to improve child outcomes, and ultimately improve graduation rates. The VDOE provides specialized training and technical assistance to local schools divisions in the implementation of evidence-based practices in Early Childhood programs.
Improvement Strategies Included in the SSIP
Collaborate to offer high-quality professional development opportunities.
  • Coordinate bi-annual Creating Connections to Shining Stars conference for early intervention, early childhood, and early childhood special education professionals;
  • Support Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) in increasing inclusion of children with disabilities in a range of programs including but not limited to Head Start, Virginia Preschool Initiative (VPI), and VPI+, and public/private community based childcare through the implementation of the Inclusive Placement Opportunities for Preschoolers (IPOP), a systems approach to preschool inclusive practices;
  • Promote awareness and or deliver professional development to expand the knowledge and implementation of the Virginia Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals, which outlines standards for competent practice, identifying what early childhood professionals must know, be able to do, and effective practices around interactions between children and adults;
  • Promote awareness and or deliver professional development to expand the knowledge and implementation of the Virginia Curriculum Review Rubric and Planning Tool, to select curricula and implement with fidelity;
  • Promote awareness and or deliver professional development to expand the knowledge and implementation of the Virginia’s Foundation Blocks for Early Learning, a set of minimum standards in literacy, mathematics, science, history and social science, health and physical development, personal and social development, music, and visual arts, with indicators of success for entering kindergarten for four-year-olds;
  • Support LEAs in linking the Virginia Tiered System of Supports framework to the preschool level and differentiating supports required for young children ages 2-5;
  • Participate in statewide Community of Practice in Autism for early intervention professionals wishing to learn more about effectively serving children with autism spectrum disorder and their families; and
  • Participate in Smart Beginnings coalitions where they exist.
Promote evidence-based practices in ECE.
  • Respond to requests for technical assistance from LEAs/State Operated Programs/EI programs;
  • Offer professional development on best practice to increase children’s social emotional development, communication skills, literacy skills and executive function;
  • Offer professional development on best practices to implement quality inclusion practices;
  • Offer professional development on best practices to implement positive behavior interventions and supports;
  • Maintain and promote lending libraries to provide resources to LEAs/State Operated Programs/EI programs; and
  • Develop and archive webshops, webinars, and professional development resources on TTAC Online.

Virginia Early Childhood Special Education Network

The Virginia Early Childhood Special Education Network has created a three-year Scope of Work specifically designed to improve the outcomes of young children with disabilities. The goals include:
  • create a system of partnerships with leaders in early childhood special education in order to build and sustain capacity of quality early childhood programs;
  • promote collection and use of valid, reliable, and accurate data for Indicators 6 and 7;
  • promote the use of quality curriculum-based assessment practices; and
  • explore how preschool Virginia Tiered Systems of Supports (VTSS) will be implemented and connected to K-12 VTSS to provide a full continuum of supports.
The Child Learning Leading to Graduation graphic below depicts how the VDOE will link data, recommended Early Childhood practices, and professional development to improve child outcomes.
Child Learning Leading to Graduation